Month: November 2020

Aqueduct of Segovia: The Mortar-Less Miracle

The aqueduct of Segovia is a classic example of Roman water transport architecture—simple in design, yet magnificent to behold, and surprisingly durable. The aqueduct was built in the 1st century AD to convey water from Frío River, 17 km away, to the city, and it has been carrying out this function in one form or another for the past 2,000 years. This is all the more impressive when you realize that this aqueduct was built without a single ounce of mortar.

Baby Vampires on the Loose in Sweden

Harvesting the unborn children seems to be the latest sick nightmare of Sweden’s liberal caucus. The Swedish Green Party wants to offer free, subsidised, and safe abortions in Sweden to Polish women in response to the Catholic country’s tough abortion laws.

126 years ago, Nicholas II ascended the throne

Nicholas II (Nikolai Alexandrovich Romanov), the 26-year-old son of Emperor Alexander III, inherited the throne on November 2, 1894, after the sudden death of his father Alexander III of Russia. In 1894, Alexander III became ill with terminal kidney disease (nephritis) due an accident at Borki.

The Last of the Leviathans

It is generally recognised that the German Battleship Bismarck was one of the most formidable battleships ever built. There was simply nothing to match the Bismarck. Despite the passage of 75-years the remarkable warship and her sister ship Tirpitz still commands awe and respect.

Who Is That Man?

Stephen Foster was America’s first great professional songwriter. He was the ninth child of William and Eliza Foster — arriving on earth July 4, 1826, as America was celebrating 50 years as a nation.