Category: Readers Coffee Shop

SOMETHING HAS TO CHANGE

The most beautiful words, “But, I love you.” The most painful words, “I love you, but.”
Change is inevitable but how we respond to change is a matter of choice. How many times I sat in despair at an unexpected misfortune. But, with the benefit of hindsight, things were never as bad as they at first appeared. In fact, time is much more than a great healer, it is a redeemer.

The child who recognized the man who killed him in a previous life

Reincarnation has remained on the fringe of scientific inquiry for a long time. Decades ago, American astronomer and astrobiologist Carl Sagan said that there are three claims in the (parapsychology) field which, in my opinion, deserve serious study,’ with one being ‘that young children sometimes report details of a previous life, which upon checking turn out to be accurate and which they could not have known about in any other way than reincarnation.’

Valentine’s Day: unusual facts about this holiday

Traditions, records and extraordinary ‘valentines.’
The oldest valentine in the world.
There is a legend that the very first Valentine card in the world was written by Saint Valentine before his execution. But the officially registered love note, dated February 14, 1415, belongs to the Charles, Duke of Orléans, who wrote love letters to his wife while he was in the Tower of London. This Valentine is now kept in the British Museum.

Be Careful What You Wish For

Be careful what you wish for as it could come true. Research reveals that winning the lottery doesn’t necessarily mean winning happiness. Many winners reflect that their lives were happier before they struck gold. The one positive effect is that most winners do claim to be happy but no happier than they were before their win.

Why Medieval Europeans Slept Inside Boxes

For much of human history, privacy during bedtime was an alien concept. Many poor families lived in small houses, where there was only one or two rooms, the larger of which functioned as bedroom and living room both shared by every occupant of the house, including any guests. Even in large houses and palaces, it was not uncommon for servants to sleep in the same room as the master’s. When King Henry V bedded Catherine of Valois, writes Bill Bryson in At Home, both his steward and chamberlain were present in the room. In such circumstances, bed curtains provided a little privacy. But if you wanted true privacy, you had to sleep in a box bed.