Tag: art

The 387 Houses of Peter Fritz

In 1993, while rummaging through a junk shop in Vienna, Austria, artist Oliver Croy made an extraordinary discovery—hundreds of beautiful, handcrafted architectural models each neatly wrapped in rubbish bags. Croy was so attracted by the skilled workmanship that he acquired the entire lot—nearly four hundred of them.

Artist Spends 15 Months Constructing Ghostly Pirate Ship With Ordinary Found Materials

Tattooist Jason Stieva has been creating assemblage art for almost 20 years, extending his creativity beyond the flesh and into three-dimensional space. For the past nine years, he’s been working on his Gothic Times series, which began when he acquired a portion of an old clockmakers estate. Mixing cases and mechanisms with other found materials, his sculptures are wildly surreal and filled with detail.

The Last Waltz for Europe

It was the last waltz for Europe and the last dance for humanity. Had one of Europe’s oldest, most successful and popular royal houses not been destroyed and consumed by New York-based banking houses the world would likely have been a far better place today.

The popular folk dance – Schuhplattler

The Schuhplattler is a traditional style of folk dance popular in the regions of Bavaria and Tyrol (southern Germany, Austria and the German-speaking regions of northern Italy). In this dance, the performers stomp, clap and strike the soles of their shoes (Schuhe), thighs and knees with their hands held flat (platt). There are more than 150 basic Schuhplattlers, as well as marches and acrobatic feats that are often interspersed with the basic dance in performance. They may be seen today in Europe and in German immigrant communities around the world. While the Schuhplattler is still largely performed by adults, it has become increasingly popular with youngsters, who love its colorful costumes and its bouncing, leaping, kicking and choreographed horseplay.

Cuchulain the Irish Achilles

Among all the early pieces of literature of Europe, there are two which, at exactly opposite corners of the continent, display most strikingly similar characteristics. These are the Greek and the Irish, and the legend of the Irish champion Cuchulain bears so close a resemblance to the tale of Achilles as to win for this hero the title of ‘the Irish Achilles.’ Certainly in reckless courage, power of inspiring dread, sense of personal merit and frankness of speech the Irish hero is fully equal to the mighty Greek.

Self-Loathing Students remove statues of great Romans

A Brown University student group, Decolonisation at Brown, wants the school to remove two Roman statues displayed on campus, claiming the sculptures represent ethnic-European supremacy and colonialism. The ethnic-bastardised student group at the Ivy League university in Rhode Island has lobbied the school’s Undergraduate Council of Students to support its initiative to remove statues of Roman Emperors Caesar Augustus and Marcus Aurelius.

Thomas Dixon Jr.

Thomas F. Dixon, Jr. was an American white supremacist, politician, lawyer, Baptist minister, lecturer, novelist, playwright, and filmmaker. He is perhaps best known for writing “The Clansman” which became the inspiration for D. W. Griffith’s film, The Birth of a Nation.