Tag: battle

Poland rises against totalitarianism

This is not an anniversary to be celebrated. It is a bitter reminder of what happens when a massive mono-party seeks to dominate a whole people. It becomes a government based on ‘the one true’ ideology, featuring censorship, newspeak, informing on others, and outright repression.

REMEMBRANCE SUNDAY

I make no apologies for spurning the pomp and pageantry that bull-horns Remembrance Sunday. There is much about the war that knows no political or national boundaries; war is a monument to human frailty, not strength. 

Victor’s World War II Propaganda is Pole-Axed

Victors’ propaganda disseminated by palace publishers and on-message media has created the illusion that Poland being far weaker than Hitler’s Reich was the vulnerable prey for ‘the Hitler hyena’. The same propaganda was spread after the Reich’s pre-emptive strike on Stalin’s despotic regime which had as is now known an army of 4.6 million poised to overwhelm Europe before the German pre-emptive strike.

The Audacity of Peter Tordenskjold: The Naval Captain Who Asked His Enemy For Ammo in The Middle of a Battle

On November 12, 1720 Peter Tordenskjold died in a sword duel. It will not sound familiar to most people, but he was one of the great national heroes of Denmark and Norway—countries that were once united, a daring sailor who would be the equivalent of what Nelson is to the British, Ruyter to the Dutch, Jones to the Americans or Bazán to the Spanish. Remembered in several popular songs and honored with several statues, streets, books, films and even a festival, a corvette of the Danish navy and a ship of the Norwegian navy are named after him. He is also cited in the Danish royal anthem.

The Casket and Ceremony of the Unknown Warrior

The casket of the Unknown Warrior was made of the oak timbers of trees from Hampton Court Palace. The casket was banded with iron and a crusader’s sword chosen by King George V personally, from the Royal Collection, was affixed to the top and surmounted by an iron shield bearing the inscription ‘A British Warrior who fell in the Great War 1914–1918 for King and Country’.