Tag: Christianity

Culture Killers Target Ancient Europe’s Symbolism

Runes are a set of related scripts predating the adoption of the Latin alphabet and Christianity and used by Germanic and Scandinavian tribes in the early Middle Ages. Today, they remain in use for aesthetic and symbolic purposes. But, Swedish Prosecutor General Petra Lundh wants the historic Tyr rune to be equated with the swastika over its present-day use and covert ‘Nazi messaging’, national broadcaster SVT reported.

Despite the bitter frost and coronavirus. Russians met Epiphany with traditional swimming in an ice-hole – video

On the night of January 18-19, the Russians celebrated an Orthodox holiday – Epiphany and the believers bathed in ice-holes, despite the abnormal frosts that covered many regions of the and including the capital. In Moscow, for example, the air temperature dropped to minus 23 degrees. Some regions have canceled traditional bathing because of the coronavirus, but most officials organised special fonts, near which doctors, rescuers and police were on duty. In the Moscow region, about 220 ice holes were equipped and entrances to them with convenient parking, TASS reports.

Eastern Epiphany: the history and traditions of the holiday – January 18-19

On January 19 (January 6, old style) Eastern Christians celebrate the Baptism of the Lord, or Epiphany. Baptism, like Easter, is considered the oldest holiday in Christian culture. This day is associated with the gospel event – the baptism of Jesus Christ by John the Baptist in the Jordan River. Here you can read about the history, meaning and traditions of the holiday.

Be Careful What You Wish For

Be careful what you wish for as it could come true. Research reveals that winning the lottery doesn’t necessarily mean winning happiness. Many winners reflect that their lives were happier before they struck gold. The one positive effect is that most winners do claim to be happy but no happier than they were before their win.

Why Medieval Europeans Slept Inside Boxes

For much of human history, privacy during bedtime was an alien concept. Many poor families lived in small houses, where there was only one or two rooms, the larger of which functioned as bedroom and living room both shared by every occupant of the house, including any guests. Even in large houses and palaces, it was not uncommon for servants to sleep in the same room as the master’s. When King Henry V bedded Catherine of Valois, writes Bill Bryson in At Home, both his steward and chamberlain were present in the room. In such circumstances, bed curtains provided a little privacy. But if you wanted true privacy, you had to sleep in a box bed.