Tag: Ethnic traditions

The Great Railway of Renaissance Europe

Adolf Hitler’s plans for renaissance Germany included an extraordinary new railway that by comparison would reduce all other railways rolling stock to almost laughable levels. This railway was designed to connect the most important cities in Greater Germany with trains 7 metre high (30 feet), carrying up to 4,000 passengers at speeds of 200 kilometres per hour.

Zones free of LGBT idolatry

The Polish Ministry of Justice has developed a bill that will deprive lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people of opportunity to adopt and adopt children. The country has already banned adoption for same-sex couples, but the ban can be circumvented if one future parent applies. Now the Polish authorities want to deprive LGBTIQ people of this opportunity as well.

The Death Experience

Death and Transfiguration is neither poem nor soliloquy. The hour of midnight had long struck when my thoughts asked the question, what is it like to die? I was alone, the background to my whimsical notions was Richard Strauss’s musical-poem, “Death and Transfiguration”.

Maslenitsa: Slavic ‘Spring Festival’

Maslenitsa (Belarusian: Масленіца, Russian: Мaсленица, Rusyn: Fašengy, Ukrainian: Масниця, ; also known as Butter Lady, Butter Week, Crepe week, or Cheesefare Week) is an Eastern Slavic religious and folk holiday, which has retained a number of elements of Slavic mythology in its ritual, celebrated during the last week before Great Lent, that is, the eighth week before Eastern Orthodox Pascha (Easter).

Saint David’s Day – March 1

Saint David’s Day (Welsh: Dydd Gŵyl Dewi Sant or Dydd Gŵyl Dewi or the Feast of Saint David, is the feast day of Saint David, the patron saint of Wales, and falls on 1 March, the date of Saint David’s death in 589 AD. The feast has been regularly celebrated since the canonisation of David in the 12th century, by Pope Callixtus II, though it is not a public holiday in the UK.

Gaia – Mother Earth

What does Gaia mean?
In Greek mythology, Gaia (/ˈɡeɪə, ˈɡaɪə/; from Ancient Greek Γαῖα, a poetical form of Γῆ Gē, “land” or “earth”), also spelled Gaea /ˈdʒiːə/, is the personification of the Earth and one of the Greek primordial deities.

Bulgarian Kukeri

It’s related to the late winter festival cycle. According to pagan beliefs, the winter was a time of evil, so the Kukeri had the task to chase away everything evil the winter represented with their scary masques. Therefore it’s not a counterpart of Halloween. It’s rather related to the traditions that came to be associated with the Lent, even though there is no sanctioned carnival tradition in the Orthodox Church. The Lent celebrations, like Kukeri or jumping over fires, were and are very much frowned upon by the Church. The only similarity to Halloween are the scary masques.