Tag: Imperial Russia

The Cossack Inferno

100 years ago, in November 1920, the White Guards evacuated from the Crimea. Off media radar is one of the most horrific holocausts to stigmatise the half-human race. The proud Cossack had long suffered stigmatisation, hate and horror by the Bolsheviks. On November 14, 1920 one of the largest flotillas in European history was moored off the bay at Sevastopol in Crimea. The rescue by armada included 150 ships of every size and type imaginable. Most but not all were ships of Imperial Russia.

WWI: Soldiers’ Leisure and Feasts in the Rear

On November 11, 1918, the Compiègne Agreement was signed in northern France, which ended the First World War (1914 – 1918), or, as it was then called, the Great War. For that time, it was the most massive and bloody military conflict of all the previous 15 thousand conflicts known: 38 states, having mobilized 68 million people, fought for economic dominance and territory for more than four years.

Spooky stuff: Contacting spirits of the dead

High society circles in St. Petersburg in the late 19th century were fascinated with seances and efforts to contact the dead. There was one problem, however. This macabre movement in fact had started as a prank by two young charlatans in the U.S. The fraudulent nature of this pseudo-science, however, didn’t stop educated and powerful Russians from indulging in what is known as ‘Spiritualism’.

When Women Failed at Sea

Consisting of patriotic young ladies following the outbreak of the Great War (1914 – 1918) the initiative was unlikely to provide real assistance to the country in distress. Nevertheless, 35 determined ladies had a different opinion. Dressed in sailor uniforms, they learned the charter, went into the navy’s ranks, followed orders and prepared to die for the Fatherland on the various fronts of the First World War.

126 years ago, Nicholas II ascended the throne

Nicholas II (Nikolai Alexandrovich Romanov), the 26-year-old son of Emperor Alexander III, inherited the throne on November 2, 1894, after the sudden death of his father Alexander III of Russia. In 1894, Alexander III became ill with terminal kidney disease (nephritis) due an accident at Borki.