Tag: Looting art

SCULPTURES OF THE THIRD REICH VOLUMES I, II and III

THE THIRD REICH’S architectural triumphs, Olympic events and trade exhibitions, were extravagantly adorned by the most stunning sculptures. These splendours have since been destroyed and their records airbrushed out of the history books by the victors of World War II. For this reason, the names and works of the greatest sculptors in history may be better known and appreciated in 2,000 years than they are today.

TV channel explains the purchase and destruction of Hitler’s paintings

A controversial TV show will offer its audience a chance to destroy Adolf Hitler’s paintings British Channel 4 confirmed on Friday. According to a Channel 4 spokesperson, the Jimmy Carr Destroys Art debate will represent ‘a thoughtful and nuanced exploration of the limits of free expression in art’ as it will allow the selected and goaded public in a studio to decide on the fate of several pieces.

Forget Victors’ Propaganda. Germany is not the Pit Bull Terrier of Europe

Germany is described by war victors’ propaganda as being a European pit bull terrier. The myth is that Germany is an aggressive territorially ambitious country never happy unless intent on war with her neighbours and bent on world domination. Hence the justification for applying restraints and even today denying occupied Germany its legal constitution and independence. 

Crime the First Law of War

Some of the most hackneyed expressions in the English language refer to the ‘Blitz or Dunkirk Spirit’, ‘Britain at Bay’ and ‘We’re all in this together’. Ironically, these events were the first two but indeed many more were a consequence of Churchill’s catastrophic political blunders.

WWII Allied Rape Fest

Unelected warlord Winston Churchill said to the Germans in January 1945, ‘We Allies are no monsters.  This, at least I can say, on behalf of the United Nations, to Germany. Peace, though based on unconditional surrender, will bring to Germany and Japan immense and immediate alleviation of suffering and agony.’