Tag: Stalin

WHY DIE FOR STALIN?

Few people realise, perhaps because they have never been told, is that Hitler’s Germany never, before or during World War II, declared war on Britain or France or their overseas territories. On September 3, 1939 Britain and France disappointed their citizens by declaring war on Germany.

The world’s most beautiful nation sucked into the EU swamp

The Daily Mail’s travel section once invited readers to identify the world’s most beautiful country. The surprising but obvious choice was Latvia. The nation dubbed ‘The Canada of Europe’ recovered its independence from the Soviet Bloc in August 1991. The Latvians right to take care of their affairs ended when their small but beautiful nation was coerced into joining the European Union Bloc in 2004.

History of the Past

Since the mid-20th century, the world has only ever heard one side of the most horrific war in human history. During the 75 years that have now passed, only a single narrative of the great conflict has been heard.

The Prophecies of Vanga

If you are concerned about where our world is heading it would be well to take an interest in Vangelia Pandeva Dimitrova (Vanga 1911 – 1996). Vanga lived in Rupite, which straddles the borders of Bulgaria, Macedonia and Greece. It is a place said to be a source of incredible cosmic energy.

A Difficult and Painful Death

A DIFFICULT AND PAINFUL DEATH: On 1 March 1953, Stalin’s staff found him semi-conscious on the bedroom floor of his Volynskoe dacha. He had suffered a cerebral haemorrhage. He was moved onto a couch and remained there for three days. He was hand-fed using a spoon, given various medicines and injections, and leeches were applied to him.

The Cursed Soldiers of Poland

On February 1 1945, Poland’s General Anders reproached Winston Churchill for not adhering to the English guarantees (to defend Poland’s independence). He asked the unelected British Prime Minister. ‘What shall we say to our soldiers? Soviet Russia is now confiscating half of our territory and wants the remaining part of Poland to be managed according to her own fashion. We know from experience where that leads.’