Tag: World War Two

April 25 War of the Worlds

Unique archival photographs of Soviet commanders during a meeting with the Allies are published today on the website of the Russian Ministry of Defense in the section ‘Meeting on the Elbe: Unknown Pages’, the press service of the military department.

The United States Leads the World in Assassinations

Since 1865 more U.S. heads of state have been assassinated than in any other country.  Abraham Lincoln (1865), James A. Garfield (1882), William McKinley (1901) and John F. Kennedy (1963) were all cut down. There was also an attempted assassination of Franklin D. Roosevelt in Miami on February 15, 1933. Had it succeeded then war with Germany might well have been averted.

The Wars of the Dictators

‘If our two countries on that account should be destined to meet again on the field of battle, there would nevertheless be a difference in the motives. I, Herr Daladier, shall be leading my people in a fight to rectify a wrong, whereas the others would be fighting to preserve that wrong.’ ~ Adolf Hitler President-Chancellor.

How Palace Historians Spun Victory as Defeat

The claim that Prime Minister Chamberlain capitulated to German President-Chancellor Adolf Hitler by signing the Munich Agreement is constantly spun as a cowardly act. William Joyce provides the best backdrop to those pivotal events. His honesty was the real reason behind the Irish-American illegally to the hangman in Wandsworth Prison.

WHY DIE FOR STALIN?

Few people realise, perhaps because they have never been told, is that Hitler’s Germany never, before or during World War II, declared war on Britain or France or their overseas territories. On September 3, 1939 Britain and France disappointed their citizens by declaring war on Germany.

Heroic War Pigeons

World War One, and to some extent, the Second World War, was a strange blend of archaic and modern technology. The First World War, in particular, saw many technological innovations such as machine guns, grenades, submarines, warplanes and tanks, and despite the advances in radio and communications technology, many field commanders preferred to use carrier pigeons to convey important messages. Radio sets were too heavy to carry into battle, and field telephone lines snapped easily. With a homing pigeon, one could write a message on a piece of paper, place it inside a small canister and attach it to the pigeon’s leg. Once the pigeon was released, it would invariably try to fly back home and deliver the message.