Category: History

British forced surrendering German Troops into cages in Belgian Zoos

When the British troops took the Belgian city of Antwerp, hitherto held by the Germans, they found that they did not have a suitable place to keep the prisoners locked up. After searching unsuccessfully for a cinema or theatre that could serve as a prison, the British realized that the zoo was empty, since, it was said, the hungry population had eaten most of the animals. Thus, the zoo was soon filled with new occupants. The six thousand prisoners who were to be accommodated there were distributed by category; The officers, the Belgian fascists and the citizens who had collaborated with the Germans ended up in the lions’ enclosure. Prisoners of another type were assigned the bear pit, the tiger cage, or the monkey house. As a witness would describe, ‘the prisoners remained sitting on piles of straw, looking through the bars.’

The remains of the soldiers of the army of Napoleon fertilized the fields of Britain

Burial sites on the Waterloo battlefield have not yet been identified. Tony Pollard, director of the Scottish Centre for War and Conflict Archaeology at the University of Glasgow, UK, has researched private letters, memoirs, and sketches of people who visited the Belgian village of Waterloo shortly after the battle. The results are presented in a paper published in the  Journal of Conflict Archeology 

Democracy is likely the most abused term in human history

The Second World War never did formally end; it merely adapted to circumstances. The next stage was to mirror former U.S. President Abraham Lincoln’s judgement: ‘Destroy a people’s racial bond and you destroy its natural ride and resilience. The race mixers mongrelised offspring thus becomes more easily controlled and defeated, and their future depends on stronger peoples.’

The largest city in the world located above the Arctic Circle

Murmansk was completely destroyed during World War II. In terms of the number of German bombs dropped per square meter, it is second only to Stalingrad. Located on the coast of the cold Barents Sea, Murmansk serves today as the main northern gateway of Russia. One of the country’s largest ports, through which it conducts regular trade with the rest of the world, is located here.

Why no Requiems for Europe’s Greatest Social Reformers

Napoleon Bonaparte and Adolf Hitler had much in common. The first was Italian yet he liberated and led the French nation. The latter was of Austrian birth but freed and championed the German people. Napoleon put an end to French revolutionary abuses. Adolf Hitler brought an end to the corruption and banking houses usurious deprivation following the victors’ vicious terms inflicted upon Germany after World War One. 

I Survived a Firing Squad

Can you imagine what it must be like to be marched out to face a firing squad, say goodbye to your closest friend who is standing next to you and then have the squad shoulder their rifles and march away having not fired a shot?  What are the odds of that happening during a war situation?

Doctor, I will be very grateful to you if you help my wife kill the children

EXCLUSIVE: Early in the morning of May 1, 1945, the last chief of staff of the ground forces of Nazi Germany, General Hans Krebs, presented the commander of the 8th Guards Army, General Vasily Ivanovich Chuikov, with Adolf Hitler’s political testament, in which he appointed members of the new German government headed by Admiral Karl Dönitz. Krebs announced Hitler’s self-martyrdom and was authorised by the new Chancellor Joseph Goebbels to negotiate a truce with the Soviet side. The Soviet side recognized only unconditional surrender.

In Memory of May 1st 1945

In Memory of May 1st 1945
a poem by Clara Sharland
‘In Memory of May 1st, 1945’ is a poem of mourning and hope: mourning for Adolf Hitler, who self-martyred on 30 April 1945; hope for Germany, for National Socialism, and for the Aryan race, all of which lived on to the next day. The poem subtly emphasizes hope over mourning by commemorating not the day of Hitler’s death, but the day after.