British forced surrendering German Troops into cages in Belgian Zoos

When the British troops took the Belgian city of Antwerp, hitherto held by the Germans, they found that they did not have a suitable place to keep the prisoners locked up. After searching unsuccessfully for a cinema or theatre that could serve as a prison, the British realized that the zoo was empty, since, it was said, the hungry population had eaten most of the animals. Thus, the zoo was soon filled with new occupants. The six thousand prisoners who were to be accommodated there were distributed by category; The officers, the Belgian fascists and the citizens who had collaborated with the Germans ended up in the lions’ enclosure. Prisoners of another type were assigned the bear pit, the tiger cage, or the monkey house. As a witness would describe, ‘the prisoners remained sitting on piles of straw, looking through the bars.’

Say only, what you can do for your country

MICHAEL WALSH: Through my 55 years of political activity, I have consistently spoken in favour of excluding politicians from the parliaments of the Western powers. The principle of politicians is so deeply ingrained my stance has been likened to removing blood from the human body to make it more efficient.

Company manhunts their fast disappearing employee who got 286 salaries at once

The man was ridiculously overpaid by accident, promised to return the money, and then resigned and vanished. An office worker at Chilean cold cuts conglomerate Cial has walked off with 286 times his salary after his employer accidentally overpaid him last month, local media outlets recently reported. The company is attempting to take legal action against him – if they can find him – for misappropriation of its property.

Unelected EU drugs cartel oligarch can’t find Pfizer CEO texts

The European Commission downplays the importance of the missing messages, which were sent during Covid-19 vaccine negotiations. The European Commission claims it is unable to locate text messages sent between its president, Ursula von der Leyen, and Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla during talks for a huge vaccine deal, last year, but has denied prior charges of maladministration from an EU watchdog.